WWW.DISSERS.RU


    !


Pages:     | 1 | 2 || 4 | 5 |   ...   | 21 |

6. If the criminal refuses to stop, the policemen a) make an effort to overtake him or to edge him into the side of the road;

b) simply keep close behind the criminals where he can see them in his driving mirror;

c) follow every move the criminal makes;

d) always keep themselves in full view of the criminal.

7. To tail the escaping car means a) to keep close behind the criminal where he can see police car in his driving mirror;

b) to follow every move the criminal makes;

c) that if the criminal slows down, the police slow down too, if the criminal accelerates, the police accelerate too;

d) to make an effort to overtake the criminal or to edge him into the side of the road.

8. Police method of tailing the escaping car is used in order to a) make the criminal lose his head and stop of his own accord;

b) make the criminal take greater risks and crash his car;

c) make the criminal get excited and make mistakes which, in high-speed driving, might be fatal;

d) demonstrate the psychological advantage which the hunter always has over the hunted.

9. Police car in Great Britain is a) yellow cab;

b) panda car;

c) black taxi.

Text 7. Do not break the speed limit...

American films are full of big, fast cars and car chases. The bad guys go straight past red traffic lights, and people have to jump out of the way. The police do the same. Cars turn over and catch fire. Twenty or thirty cars end up in one big crash.

Thats in the films. Real life is very different. You will be surprised when you go to the USA. People drive carefully, and the traffic is very slow. The speed limit in most states is 55 miles per hour! (That is 88 km/h.) It is not a good idea to break the speed limit. The Highway Patrol (the road police) have very sophisticated methods. They have cameras, radar and computers. And they have helicopters! You cant see a police car in your mir-ror... but look up. At this very moment, the pilot above you is reporting you to a Highway Patrol officer three miles ahead! Task. Listen to the cassette.

You are in the Highway Patrol car. You get information from the helicopter. Copy and complete the table with information to help you catch the two cars.

colour type speed road direction Text 8. Old technology In western films, the sheriff and the bank robbers are on horseback. Cowboys only get off their horses to sleep or have a drink in a bar. And when they walk, they are bow-legged their legs are in the shape of a horses back.

Is that all in the past Do horses now all live a quiet life in riding schools No, they dont. In Canada and the United States, the police still work with horses.

The police in the US National Parks are called rangers. Even today you will see rangers on horseback in Yellowstone, Yosemite and the other Parks.

Of course in Canada they have the famous Mounties.

The word Mounties means on horseback. Their full name is the RCMP the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Most of them drive big police cars now, but you can still see Mounties and their horses doing normal police jobs.

Around London, too, you will often see policewomen and men on horses. They are very good for crowd control, says PC Paddy Ladd. Horses are not dangerous. My Millie is a lovely old girl she wouldnt hurt a fly. But people are frightened of horses because theyre big. If we run into a crowd, the people just disappear. Millie and I always go to Tottenham football ground on Saturdays. Before and after the match there is sometimes a bit of trouble especially if Tottenham looses! Text 9. The principal department of the uniform police The principal department of the uniform police keeps a watch over the ebb and flow of crime throughout the police area. If, for example, there is an outbreak of bag-snatching in a particular district, the department would consider whether to increase the number of men on the beats and the frequency of patrols in the district or whether to try some other means for preventing the crimes and catching the criminals. Weekly statistics are kept usually in the form of graphs showing how many and what sorts of crimes are being committed in each division of the force. In some forces, display maps are also used with coloured pins to show the incidence of crime in more detail. Both the diagrams and the maps make it possible to see whether the preventive measures have succeeded or not and where the weak spots in the police work are.

Task 1. Fill in the gaps with a proper preposition.

a) The uniform police keep a watch the ebb and flow crime throughout the police area.

b) They try some other means preventing the crimes and catching the criminals.

c) If, for example, there is an outbreak bag-snatching a particular district, the department would consider whether to increase the number men the beats and the frequency patrols the district or whether to try some other means preventing the crimes and catching the criminals.

for, of, over, of, in, for, of, in, of, on.

Task 2. Answer the questions.

1. What means for preventing crimes and catching criminals can the uniform police use 2. What is the aim of using weekly statistics Text 10. The ideal police officer The ideal police officer would be a man with the mental ability of a first-rate barrister, the organising capacity of a secretary of state, and the tact of a family doctor.

The ideal policeman, of course, should possess all the characteristics usually given to the hero of a romantic novel. He should be quick-witted, intelligent, and observant; he should have a wide knowledge of human nature, he should be exceptionally tactful, he should have a cool, unprejudiced mind; he should be always ready to act on his own initiative; he should also be courageous, strong, and incorruptible. But if all these qualifications were insisted upon, there would be very few policemen. One or two qualities, however, really are essential.

The first task of a policeman, therefore, is to steady the nerves of the people who have called him in. If he himself is flustered, he will seldom if ever be able to get all the information he needs. His observation will be inaccurate and his mind will not be as clear as it should be. From this it follows that the two most important qualities, which a policeman needs, are tact by which is meant the ability to deal with all types and classes of people without upsetting them and quiet nerves.

Task 1. Find English equivalents of the following Russian expressions in the text:

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- , ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- .

Task 2. Agree or disagree with the following statements.

If a police officer wants to make a success of his carrier he should a) cultivate the calm attitude of mind;

b) encourage the qualities of tact and steadiness;

c) judge who is right and who is wrong;

d) use force rather than persuasion;

e) be able to steady the nerves of the people who have called him in;

f) control moral behaviour of individuals;

g) have the detailed knowledge of law.

Task 3. Answer the questions.

1. What are the two most important qualities, which a policeman needs 2. What other features of character are necessary for successful work of a policeman Text 11. The work of policeman demands exceptional strength of character The work of policeman demands exceptional strength of character and tact. In a recent case, the local police had had some difficulty in catching a man who had been interfering with a number of women in a certain district. None of the assaults amounted to rape, but on two occasions violence had been used, and there was an obvious danger that the man was working himself up to much more serious crimes, possibly even murder. None of his terrified victims had been able to describe him properly the crimes were all committed after dark and a policewoman was therefore asked to act as a decoy. She changed into plain clothes, and the plan was that she should stroll down a road, which the man was known to appear while a police car waited round a corner near by. The first part of the plan went forward without a hitch. The man appeared and went up to the policewoman. He began to make improper suggestions to her and tried to take her arm. She shook herself free-she had to be careful that she did not act as an agent provocateur and continued walking along the road. The man followed her, but all the time she had been so absorbed in her role that she had not realised that instead of walking towards the waiting police car she had been walking away from it and she was now almost out of reach of any help she might need. The man again caught her arm and plucked at her dress. She turned on him angrily and told him to take himself off, but inwardly she had become extremely frightened. The man held back for a moment, but once again he overtook her. She was just preparing to shout for help when a group of people came out of a house on the road and the man hurried away. She was able to give a complete and accurate description of the man, who was arrested on the following day. He was later picked out from an identification parade by a number of his victims, and in due course he was sent to prison.

Task 1. Find English equivalents of the following Russian expressions in the text:

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- ;

- .

Task 2. Fill in the gaps with a proper preposition:

a) In a recent case, the local police had had some difficulty in catching a man who had been interfering a number of women a certain district.

b) She changed plain clothes, and the plan was that she should stroll a road, which the man was known to appear while a police car waited a corner near by.

c) The first part of the plan went forward a hitch.

In, into, round, without, with, down, in.

d) The man followed her, but all the time she had been so absorbed her role that she had not realised that instead of walking the waiting police car she had been walking away it and she was now almost reach of any help she might need.

e) She was just preparing shout help when a group of people came a house the road and the man hurried away.

f) He was later picked out an identification parade a number of his victims, and in due course he was sent prison.

In, to, out of, from, towards, out of, for, on, by, to, from.

Task 3. Match each word and expression on the left with their meanings on the right:

- to stroll down a road - to be absorbed by the role - to identify a person - to make improper suggestion - to interfere with somebody - to ac as a decoy - the next day - to walk along a road - to act a role of a victim - the following day - to act the role very well - to pick out a person from an identification parade Task 4. Are you attentive Check yourself. Arrange sequence of events in the right order:

- the policewoman changed into plain clothes;

- the man went up to the policewoman again caught her arm and plucked at her dress;

- a group of people came out of a house on the road and the man hurried away;

- he began to make improper suggestions to her and tried to take her arm;

- she shook herself free and continued walking along the road;

- he was later picked out from an identification parade by a number of his victims, and in due course he was sent to prison;

- she was able to give a complete and accurate description of the man, who was arrested on the following day;

- she turned on him angrily and told him to take himself off, but inwardly she had become extremely frightened;

- the man appeared and went up to the policewoman;

- she had been so absorbed in her role that she had not realised that instead of walking towards the waiting police car she had been walking away from it and she was now almost out of reach of any help she might need;

- she strolled down a road;

- the man followed her;

- she was just preparing to shout for help.

Text 12. Golden rule of the police The police have nothing whatever to do with the moral behaviour of individuals. They do not regard themselves as judges of what a private person should or should not do so long as the law is not broken. Drunkenness, gambling, adultery, are not, with certain exceptions, criminal offences, and the police never interfere with such cases if no offence has been committed. On the other hand, every police officer, man or woman has had some experience of being asked for advice by members of the public on domestic or family matters. Such advice as the police officer is able to give is, of course, always given, but it is a golden rule throughout the police service that advice should never be given unless it is first asked for. The happy relationship which exists between police and public in Britain would be immediately destroyed if the police ever got the reputation of being busybodies who put their noses into affairs with which they are not properly concerned.

Task 1. Agree or disagree with the following statements.

1. The police control the moral behaviour of individuals.

2. Drunkenness, gambling, adultery are criminal offences and the police interfere with such cases.

3. Golden rule of the police is to prevent crimes at any cost.

4. To be a busybody means to put ones nose into affairs with which this person is not properly concerned.

Task 2. Fill in the gaps with a proper preposition.

a) The police have nothing whatever to do the moral behaviour of individuals.

b) Every police officer, man or woman, has had some experience of being asked advice members the public domestic or family matters.

c) The happy relationship which exists police and public in Britain would be immediately destroyed if the police ever got the reputation being busybodies who put their noses affairs which they are not properly concerned.

between, with, of, for, with, into, of, by, on.

Task 3. Comment on the following statements.

1. The police have nothing to do with the moral behaviour of individuals.

2. The golden rule of the police service is that advice should never be given unless it is first asked for.

Text 13. The detailed knowledge of law is absolutely necessary For the policeman the detailed knowledge of law is absolutely necessary. It is not enough for a policeman to arrest a burglar, who is breaking into a house, simply because housebreaking is commonly accepted as a criminal act. When he comes to charge the burglar with his crime, he must quote the relevant section of the Act of Parliament, which lays down housebreaking as a criminal offence. He must appreciate, for instance, the subtle difference between larceny and burglary. He must understand and be able to apply the laws, which govern his powers of arrest, the laws relating to evidence and the code for conducting an inquiry which is laid down in the Judges Rules. He must learn, for example, that a man may not be searched in a public place, and may not be searched at all unless he has agreed to be searched or unless he is under arrest. If one citizen brings a charge against another citizen, the policeman must be able to sum up quickly whether there is a prima facie case or not and he must know in what circumstances he is obliged to take the charge, whatever his own opinion, and when he can refuse it. The amount of law, he is expected to know, is in fact more than a barrister has to use in daily legal work.

Task 1. Find English equivalents of the following Russian expressions:

- ;

- - ();

Pages:     | 1 | 2 || 4 | 5 |   ...   | 21 |






2011 www.dissers.ru -

, .
, , , , 1-2 .